The Gastrointestinal Tract in Critical Illness: a hypothesis dating back 3 millennia

Professor John Marshall

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Lecture overview

Events occurring within the gastrointestinal tract are largely hidden from the clinician, yet they play an important role in the pathogenesis of critical illness.  This talk will trace the origins of the concept of the gut as the motor of critical illness from the time of the ancient Egyptians to the 21st century.

Learning Objectives:
By the end of this lecture, the attendee will be able to:

  1. Describe the normal bacterial flora of the gut in health and critical illness.
  2. Trace changing views of the role of the gut in disease. 
  3. Describe the role of the gut as a reservoir of endotoxin.
  4. Discuss gut-directed strategies to reduce the burden of critical illness.

This lecture is equal to 1 CE Contact Hour, 1 CPD Point, and 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit

 

Additional CME Info

Release Date: February 1, 2020, Termination Date: January 31, 2023

Accreditation: This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of EB Medicine and Continulus. EB Medicine is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Credit Designation: EB Medicine designates this internet enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ per lecture. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. 

Commercial Support: This activity received no commercial support.

Earning Credit: In order to earn CME credit, the participant must take the pre-test, listen to the lecture, take the CME post-test, and complete the post-test evaluation.

 

 

Duration 1 hour(s).

Lecture speaker

Professor John Marshall

John Marshall is a Professor of Surgery at the University of Toronto, and a trauma surgeon and intensivist at St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto, Canada.  His academic interests are sepsis, trauma, and the innate immune response. His laboratory studies the cellular mechanisms that prolong neutrophil survival in critical illness by preventing neutrophil programmed cell death, or apoptosis. He has published more than 260 manuscripts, and 70 book chapters, and is the editor of 2 books. He is the founding chair of the International Forum of Acute Care Trialists (InFACT) – a global network of investigator-led critical care clinical research groups, and a member of the Council of the World Federation of Societies of Intensive and Critical Care Medicine and of the executive committee of the International Severe Acute Respiratory Infections Consortium. He is past-chair of the International Sepsis Forum, past-President of the Surgical Infection Society, and past-chair of the Canadian Critical Care Trials Group.  He has given invited lectures at more than 400 meetings around the world, and is a member of the editorial boards of seven journals.

 

CME Faculty Disclosure: It is the policy of EB Medicine to ensure objectivity, balance, independence, transparency, and scientific rigor in all CME-sponsored educational activities. All faculty participating in the planning or implementation of a sponsored activity are expected to disclose to the audience any relevant financial relationships and to assist in resolving any conflict of interest that may arise from the relationship. In compliance with all ACCME Essentials, Standards, and Guidelines, all faculty for this CME activity were asked to complete a full disclosure statement. The speaker did not report any relevant financial interest or other relationship with the manufacturer(s) of any commercial product(s) discussed in this educational presentation.  

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